DirectX / OpenGL development on Surface Pro 2

Discussion in 'Microsoft Surface Pro 2' started by nairdaen, May 21, 2014.

  1. nairdaen

    nairdaen New Member

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    Hi!

    I've searched in several places and haven't found an answer for my question. I'm enrolled in a MS. CS. program that requires to do some development using OpenGL and/or DirectX, I already have a laptop with dedicated graphics that I currently use but it is too big/heavy to be using it while traveling. I'm considering buying a Surface Pro 2 to do some development and also for taking notes. Has anyone used their Surface Pro 2 for C++/DirectX/OpenGL development? Any recommendations?

    Thanks!
     
  2. kevinlevrone

    kevinlevrone Active Member

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    Since your development type involve graphics, I think the Surface Pro 3 could suit you better because of a larger screen. Price is the same, and there is also the option for HD5000 graphics in the i7 form.

    As far as graphics go, I think that it is better to develop on a device with low-midrange graphics power (but with a graphics card very compatible to all 3D standards), because you don't want to see 40FPS on your development computer and then move to a regular customer laptop and see 15FPS, right ? :)
     
  3. amk.

    amk. New Member

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    Actually you want the fastest possible machine to code/develop, and then get a slow as hell PC to test.

    OP: I have been using my Surface Pro to develop in Java/Groovy/Python/Android, I know its not what you are doing, but at least for me it works wonders. The 10" screen is too small to be the primary/only PC to develop with, but if gets the job done. Im doing a B.Sc, and I have not used a single paper since I started lol, I just have one notebook for each subject in OneNote and it just rocks. (All books in PDF, whats not already in PDF I just scan it and add it to OneNote myself)

    If you want the SP2 Id wait a bit for the price to drop or you might want to take a look at the SP3 (I find it WAY to big for my needs, but it might suit yours).
     
  4. kevinlevrone

    kevinlevrone Active Member

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    So you usually move you DirectX/OpenGL executables on your test machine after each build ? I usually debug and test my graphics apps on my own development machine 90% of the time.
     
  5. amk.

    amk. New Member

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    Well, I dont make stuff in DirectX, but if I want to test performance I test first that everything works how it should, debug and profile the programm in my dev machine. Then, every few builds I test on another old machine.
     
  6. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes Well-Known Member

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    What kind of OpenGL/DirectX you are3 doing? For school or small game to learn either? no problem.
    For actual develop something, then it may be a problem because the Intel GPU has it's quirks and isn't fully DirectX and OpenGL supported (many games crashes because of this), like you would expect from Nvidia and AMD side.
     
  7. nairdaen

    nairdaen New Member

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    Thanks all for your comments!

    @GoodBytes: The idea is to use it to develop school assignments that require OpenGL / DirectX and eventually a game engine and/or a game (my program is geared towards game development). I'd be working with OpenGL 3.3 and with DirectX 9c / 11 and doing some Shader work with both.
     
  8. the_new_normal

    the_new_normal Member

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    I'd be wary of the Intel graphics drivers.
    While quite good for what they are, NVIDIA and AMD have been at it for a long time.
     
  9. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree. As much as a the Surface Pro line is amazing, Intel graphics have their quirks, games already has trouble running (and I mean: not crashing, not performance issue, we are not there yet).
    For support for what you are doing, and ensure what you are doing works properly and not waste you time for a Direct3D/2D or OpenGL shader call not supported or not liked by Intel graphics and doesn't work right or well, and waste your time trying to figure out, get a device with an Nvidia or AMD graphics.

    If you are willing to do your OpenGL/DirectX work on your desktop computer instead, and see as you go if your stuff works on the Surface Pro or not, then that is fine. But assume the worst case scenario.
    As a student you seek maximum reliability, and take 0 chances, and Intel integrated graphics is something that doesn't provide you this.
     

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