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Windows 8.1 will include boot to desktop option to bypass 'Metro' interface

Sin

New Member
Russ, thanks for the point of view. I know this topic has a tendency to get heated, which I do not want nor do I understand. Personally I currently seem to align with Microsoft's direction, but that can just as easily not be the case. One thing that I have always given Microsoft credit for was a highly customizable system. Even when Microsoft doesn't want to make something, the way that the OS is designed typically allows for creative developers to step in and fill the void. I have no issues with peoples preferences, I actually enjoy find difference. It's how I have discovered some on my best practices. The people that really get to me are the ones that refuse to even look at a third-party application, because they feel Microsoft should have included the capability. Microsoft is changing things and looking to find a better way. It's what they should be doing or we might as well just never upgrade. Thank again for you point of view on the issue. It's much appreciated.
 

Russ

Active Member
I know this topic has a tendency to get heated, which I do not want nor do I understand. . . . Even when Microsoft doesn't want to make something, the way that the OS is designed typically allows for creative developers to step in and fill the void. . . . The people that really get to me are the ones that refuse to even look at a third-party application, because they feel Microsoft should have included the capability.

Sin --

I have oscillated between being amused and being downright mesmerized at the amount of vitriol this thread has generated. I have used every OS since CP/M and AppleDOS, having hit every step along the way, and now I am "resistant to change." Well, that is interesting, at least, if not fascinating.

What some have forgotten, or never knew, given their ages, is that Microsoft was always a proponent of open systems. What some have forgotten, or never knew, given their ages, is that it was Bill Gates who removed the copy-protection from Excel, because he believed it was the right thing to do and that Microsoft would gain more business as a result. If anyone doesn't think he was right, just open your current copy of Lotus 1-2-3. As to Microsoft being "protective," a lot of that comes from MS's refusal to allow access to the kernel of its OS by Norton and others. That has always seemed like a wise decision to me.

If that's too difficult, then remember that when Gates split with IBM, he relinquished OS/2, on which they had expended considerable development resources, in favor of keeping his right to develop Windows. If that's too confusing, just boot to your current copy of OS/2.

Much of the current angst derives from what J5150P described in another thread as the addiction to "instant gratification." I am hugely disappointed that Microsoft has not arranged to have someone mow my lawn, but, I guess, I will just have to live with that.

Take care,
Russ
 

ArnoldC

New Member
<snip> I have used every OS since CP/M and AppleDOS, having hit every step along the way, and now I am "resistant to change." Well, that is interesting, at least, if not fascinating.
<snip>

Russ, just out of curiousity did you use Oasis, Thoroughbred, and/or CTOS?
 

Russ

Active Member
Russ, just out of curiousity did you use Oasis, Thoroughbred, and/or CTOS?

Arnold --

Not in any meaningful way. I played with everything I could get my hands on and that would run on whatever board I had cobbled together at the time, but I was always a hobbyist. I just always liked to try new stuff, even if I had no particular purpose for it.

Regards,
Russ
 

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