How strong is your loyalty!?

Discussion in 'Microsoft Surface General Discussion' started by kayzee, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. kayzee

    kayzee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    2,082
    Likes Received:
    228
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    My Device:
    SPro
    I assume you're here because you own a Surface and are a fan of Microsoft in general, that's in my case at least. But when it comes to other products, both hardware and software, where does your loyalty lie?

    Browser: Google Chrome - I just find it so clean and quick compared to many older generations of IE, although it's catching up for sure.

    Console: Sony PlayStation 3 - At the time it was mainly because of blu-ray. But I'll be sticking to Sony next generation as well because you don't need to pay in order to use on demand TV services!

    Phone: iPhone 4S - Never like Android, and tbh Windows Phone just isn't quite there imo... would buy a Surface phone if it came out though!

    Social Media: Twitter - Gave up with Facebook nearly 4 years ago now. I do use Messaging on my Surface but only really for talking to my brother and girlfriend.

    Camera: Nikon D3200 - This was actually bought for me, but now I'm a Nikon addict and wouldn't consider another company.

    So, as you can see, as much as I love Microsoft, I mostly go elsewhere even if they do make a rival product!
     
  2. compnovo

    compnovo Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2012
    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Washington State
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    I'm pretty much a straight up Microsoft fan. I use IE, I run Windows 7 and 8 on the desktops in our home and RT on my Surface, and I have a Nokia 900 with wp7. I game on my desktop and don't have a console but if I bought one it would be the Xbox now that it comes with a Blu-ray player. I'm agnostic about cameras (we have an older Canon Powershot) and I don't do social media.
     
  3. Padron26

    Padron26 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2013
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Van down by the River
    I have to agree with you about the Windows Phone it just needs more time, ive always loved windows all the way from Win 98 to my first smartphone a Motorola i930 Windows mobile.

    ive had every higher end Android phone that Verizon has to offer. I just always feel the need to Root and Rom them. and over the years it has gotten boring. ive jailbroken all of my idevices also from the iphone 4 to the iphone 5 just to open a few apps up.

    Computer based wise I cant imagine ever having to Part with any of my HP Elitebooks. they are just to reliable fast and easily accessible, ive had them from the beginning with the 8530w and p.
    ive had almost every model, I just like the new features so I always upgrade. luckily without a problem. I could use Macs but just haven't seen the same or better performance compared. I also use Dell Latitudes but there graphics are subpar.

    I love the Sp it is just a awesome piece of hardware. compared to the ipad the Sp is for work and the ipad is a toy.
     
  4. TeknoBlast

    TeknoBlast Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    763
    Likes Received:
    134
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Irving, TX
    Browser: IE, occasionally I'll use Chrome as my second browser if something cant be displayed in IE correctly.

    Console: Xbox, but also own a PS3 which I only have 4 games for. Xbox, I have over 50 games.

    Phone: Lumia 810 Windows Phone. Never owned an iPhone nor an Android phone. If the Windows Phone were ever to be dropped by MS, then I would go with an Android phone. iPhones just look boring to me.

    Social Media: I got more into Twitter these days. I use it more for information than me posting updates. I do use FB, but more to share pictures of my family.

    Camera: Nikon D5000

    I am a fan of the Microsoft products, but I do appreciate other brands as well. Too bad many people are not like myself.
     
  5. Lolvo

    Lolvo New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2013
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    39
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My Device:
    RT

    Browser: Chrome - nothing better.
    Console: Xbox/Xbox360 - there's more potential with these consoles than the playstation has ever had, with both hardware and software. I won't be delving into next gen for some time, though.
    Phone: Samsung Galaxy SIII - My first Android phone, coming from iOS. I hate it. Sure, it's cool, but I honestly need my cell phone to call, text, GPS, and search the web. I feel that the phone is wasted in my possession, and that iOS was so much more user friendly for quick, everyday actions.
    Social Media: Everything, lol - I manage my Fraternity's social media and public relations, as well as my work's, so I'm on just about every social media.
    Camera: My GSIII :p

    While I wouldn't say it's a loyalty, I wouldn't get any other Windows tablet.
     
  6. oion

    oion Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    265
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My Device:
    S2
    The former.

    Brand loyalty is inimical to smart consumerism. It's always best to try to judge any product on its own merits, brand aside.

    For example, I can't even say that I've ever been a fan of Opera the company/brand despite loving their desktop browser for over a decade. The difference between my love of a product and brand loyalty is that I see value in competition based strictly on target audience and user base, and can speak about the pros/cons of a product in usage (as opposed to, say, Firefox fanboys slamming all other browsers, for example). Still, it's easy for me to move on (or stay back in that case) when the latest Opera browser iteration falls far short of my expectations. For practical purposes like web testing, I usually have 6-8 browsers installed anyway.

    (Edit to add: You can always tell irrational brand loyalty or anti-loyalty by the way people talk about products, stating opinion as fact.)

    Having and using a ton of Microsoft products and work and home, from my perspective, is largely a function between convenience (business standards and whatnot) and price, beside functionality. Likewise, being stuck to Facebook is a function of my other friends using it; my Android phone choice is a function of price and features; I have no camera because the one on my phone is sufficient. Gaming needs--gaming desktop is enough.

    As for the Surface, I studied and found a nice, functional piece of kit that fit my needs, and that's it. Marketing generally does nothing for me, though there are certain TV ones that are memorable in the sense that I can identify the brand (e.g. IBM or Mastercard), but that doesn't make me want to go out and actually get their product until I've done enough research. I didn't even see a Surface commercial until after I bought my SurRT, months after it was already released.

    Appealing to fanaticism, fandom, loyalty--all of these things are psychologically cogent to corporate marketing tactics but can just as easily backfire. For every retarded blind fandom, there is an equally vehement opposition willing to spread inaccuracies about a product. I just wish there was no brand loyalty at all so consumers can be objective about buying things, which encourages true innovation and would let crap die out.... Just a pipe dream. :p
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  7. Name Taken

    Name Taken Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2013
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Console: None. I have always been a PC gamer. Building computers is a hobby of mine but it eventually got too easy which is how I got into watercooling. Watercooling openings up a whole new market of customization of radiators, waterblocks, pumps, fittings, tubing, coolant, reservoirs, and more.

    Phone: Being a person who likes the customize, the choice was obvious. Android Debugging Bridge and Fastboot was something I learned early for unlocking the bootloader to flash a custom recovery then flashing a new ROM and kernel. Not only that but with MultiROM I could install as many ROMs as I can like on a PC including Ubuntu. I could not imagine myself using something like an iPhone.

    Browser: Chrome works fine on desktop but the Android version does not support flash or add-ons which is why I switched to Dolphin. I am still able to sync between my desktop Chrome and Dolphin.
     
  8. LadyRaider

    LadyRaider Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2013
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Browser - Chrome
    Console - Xbox (i like kinect games)
    Phone - had an iphone 4, but it got boring. I am enjoying my Droid Razr M.
    Social Media - mostly Facebook. I read Twitter, just don't participate much
    Computer - home desktop Velocity Micro PC with Windows 8. I love that thing. My boss gave me a latest gen macbook pro, 15 inch, so I gave my dell laptop to my dad.
    Other tablets - work issued 3rd gen Ipad, I bought myself a new Nexus 7 when they came out last month.
    MP3 - ipod nano 5th gen I think (the small one that clips on you.)
     
  9. kristalsoldier

    kristalsoldier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2,314
    Likes Received:
    357
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My Device:
    SPro4
    While I am not a "fan" of MS or of any other company, I have/ use the following:

    Desktop: Win 8 Pro
    Tablets: Surface RT, Nexus 10, iPad 4
    Browser: Chrome (on desktop, Nexus 10), IE 10 (on RT, by default), Dolphin HD (on Nexus 10), Testing different browsers on the iPad
    Phone: Active use - Win Phone 8; backup phone: Samsung Galaxy (F) running Android 2.6.x
    Social Media - Sparing use of Google+

    Edit: I should mention that while I am not fan per se, I do have some preferences and compulsions for being oriented towards some companies and products. Thus, for example, I prefer not to go too deep into the Apple range of products. It is only recently that I bought an iPad (principally for its aspect ratio). But my preference is not based on familiarity (and consequent dislike) of Apple's products. Instead, it is based on my prior commitment to an eco-system. Since I have been embedded in the MS eco-system (such as it was before the world of apps and walled gardens etc.), it would be too difficult (and time consuming) for me to move fully into a different eco-system. I can work with Google because my commitment is limited to their webmail, which can easily be masked using email apps. That said, with the release of Win 8 and my getting the Surface and new desktop with Win 8, I have made a concerted effort to share (note - not fully migrate) my email between Gmail and Outlook. But this is only a superficial thing. It would become infinitely more serious if I was to move over to Apple. That would mean relearning a completely different work-flow, investing (significantly, I might add) in expensive devices etc.

    Let me give you an example - Last afternoon, I was at my local Apple store and while I was waiting to be attended to, I was looking around and wondering how would I operate if I was committed to Apple's products.

    First, there would be no Surface. This would probably be replaced by a MBA 11" or 13" - still not the same as having two form factors.
    Second, I would replace my desktop with a Mac equivalent - this would not be too much of a problem
    Third, while I am not sure if my printer works with Macs (I assume it does), if that needed replacing then that would have to be done too.
    Fourth, I would probably opt for an iPhone (which I have seen but, literally, never touched).
    Fifth, since I would have bought an iPad anyways, this remains a moot point.

    But more significantly, I would have to buy Office for Macs and find the equivalents of some of the software that I used on my past and current Windows machines. While this perhaps is not a problem, it would certainly be expensive. That IS a consideration.

    Lastly, and this is something I learnt using the iPad, the file system in Macs and iOS seems to be rather differently structured than in Windows. Now, this would be a problem - at least in the initial stages but only because of my familiarity and comfort level with the Windows system. Insurmountable? Certainly not! But it would be time consuming, frustrating (initially) etc.

    So, as you can see, it is not simply a case of brand loyalty, but it is more a question of practicality and efficacy that leads me to my buying choices (at the moment). Now, if I was to start off again (or if I won a lotter of 10 Million bucks!), I may do it differently.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2013
  10. kayzee

    kayzee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2013
    Messages:
    2,082
    Likes Received:
    228
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Essex, UK
    My Device:
    SPro
    Thanks, some great replies! As much as I love Microsoft it still makes me laugh reading Paul Thurrott's website sometimes, the ultimate fanboy! I came from hating Apple from back in my school days (when to be fair, they were crap) but now I love their products and defend them against others that seem to hate them... although I always like a bit of friendly discussion banter :)
     
  11. mitchellvii

    mitchellvii Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2013
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    559
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    My Device:
    SPro3
    My business has a large legacy investment in Office Products. Change is not possible although we still use Access 2003 and Office 2007. Office 2013 is an utter fail IMHO. The pixelization in Word is so terrible our documents (which look wonderful in Office 2007) are almost unreadable. Whoever decided the new text-smoothing algorithm used in Office 2013 was a good idea had to be stoned.
     
  12. Telstar1948

    Telstar1948 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2013
    Messages:
    435
    Likes Received:
    78
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Columbia, Missouri
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    Interesting comments!

    I've used MS products all my adult life nearly due to business use and it just naturally bled over into my personal use; however, that changed in 2009. I decided to move everything over to Mac—MacBook for the wife, Mac Mini for my desktop, couple of iPads and a couple of iPhones. While not perfect in this area, I like how everything integrates from the phone to the iPad to the laptop/desktop. Contacts, notes, email, calendar etc all syncs without any effort on my part and it does it quickly and efficiently.

    Having said that, I've made some compromises going all Mac to exist in a "Windows" world. It took me a while, along with some expense, to find software that would do what I needed on my Mac Mini. The setup I have now works well for what I do. I'm not an IT guy just a business guy. I do have one Windows program I have to run for my business so I use Parallels on my Mini to run it in a virtual machine. It's ok and gets the job done, but I had to buy Windows 7 and Parallels to do it, so more expense there. I use Office for the Mac and I've found it to be lackluster. It works, but I've been underwhelmed by the experience. In addition, there always seems to be some measure of incompatibility when sending someone an Excel file and they run it on their Windows machine (or vice versa), or something goofy sometimes in a Word file or what-have-you. Overall, I like OSX because it's truly a nice stable OS with many builtin features that I always before had to add to Windows for that particular functionality. It doesn't have everything baked in, but it offers many nice touches. I did have to get a different dedicated scanner when I move to the Mac, but most scanners and printers will work with either.

    Then there's the iPad—nice hardware and the software is well integrated. Like many have commented though, no real file system compared to OSX or Windows. Trying to get some things on the iPad or off is an exercise in patience in so many ways, or simply can't be done in some cases. I've owned and used nearly every "Office" style app available, and they all simply aren't Office—Pages et al are really slick apps, but they're light weight at best. If you're just using the iPad to surf the web, watch movies or photos, email and that sort of thing, it's really great (yes, including Angry Birds). Beyond that, unless there is a specific app designed for a particular business purpose (and many of those are hit-and-miss) that you need, the iPad only offers general support. It's fine for personal use but outside of that it gets sketchy real fast. I realize some use their iPads for business use—I suppose you could say that getting my business email on the iPad and using Maps to navigate when I'm meeting someone is business use in my case—but it truly is not designed as a business machine for most situations.

    So I've decided I'm getting a Surface Pro in the near future to replace my desktop setup and my iPad as well. It will do everything that my Mini and iPad will do now, plus some, with actually less expense and "workarounds" (read aggravation) that exists for me now. The Surface Pro form factor is a definite plus for me as well. I'll also migrate to a WP8 and will still have the integration I like for the things I mentioned above. I'm not interested in Google (Android) for several reasons chief among them is I don't want to mess with multiple ecosystems. In a way, that's what I'm doing now using nice Mac products to exist in a Windows world, and that's what has finally driven me to the point where I'm going back to Windows for my desktop, tablet and phone needs. I think as one gets older (at least in my case) you start looking for a little more simplicity in life, less hassle and fewer "things" to wrangle yet still getting the job done. Using Macs in a Windows world or entertaining thoughts of Android run contrary to what I want—one ecosystem that is designed for business and personal use. I think Windows fills that bill in my case completely.

    Sorry for the longwinded dissertation. The views I've expressed here describe where I've been and am going tech-wise and why. I'm looking forward to getting my Pro and the rest. It's going to be fun.
     
    2 people like this.

Share This Page

Search tags for this page

microsoft surface loyalty rewards

,

windows surface tablet customer loyalty