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Rethinking MSFT's Strategy

guymalloc

Member
I guess I was unlucky (or Lucky?), I couldn't afford a PC, IBM or otherwise. That forced me to use alternates, Timex, Radioshack, a CPM3 laptop, and two Commodores, before I could finally enter the DOS/Windows world. They were fun and educational, but all the BASIC and Assembly Language I did burned me out on programming. Once I had a "real" PC, I started to concentrate on actually working with it, rather than spending hours figuring out how to make it work my way. I still give kudos to IBM for our PC world today, and (reluctantly) Microsoft, for giving us a standard platform to work with. I still wonder what the computer world would be like today, if Gary Killdahl had gotten CP/M-86 ready before Bill Gates 'bought' DOS and offered it to IBM for their PC.
 

jrioux

Active Member
Once I had a "real" PC...

LOL

Those were all "real" PCs. I calculated alternative mortgage payment schedules for the state housing finance agency using my VIC-20 and a simple BASIC program. My schedules were used to market the agency's Growing Equity Mortgage, which started with lower monthly payments and then paid off early due to small payment increases each year. Later, I wrote successful state legislation using my C=64 and the PaperClip word processor. Sure, modern PCs are quicker, more powerful and easier to use, but those were real PCs, nonetheless.
 

guymalloc

Member
Ha Ha Ha!!!! The good old days! I learned 6502 assembly language so I could reprogram the sprite collisions on my Commodore 128, so I could get further in games. Ha!
 

CrippsCorner

Well-Known Member
I played Gorf and Cosmic Cruncher on my vic 20... but to each their own I suppose :)

Gorf! That was amazing, hardly anyone knows about that game :) well done that man...

gorf.png
 

MDS

Member
I guess I was unlucky (or Lucky?), I couldn't afford a PC, IBM or otherwise. That forced me to use alternates, Timex, Radioshack, a CPM3 laptop, and two Commodores, before I could finally enter the DOS/Windows world. They were fun and educational, but all the BASIC and Assembly Language I did burned me out on programming. Once I had a "real" PC, I started to concentrate on actually working with it, rather than spending hours figuring out how to make it work my way. I still give kudos to IBM for our PC world today, and (reluctantly) Microsoft, for giving us a standard platform to work with. I still wonder what the computer world would be like today, if Gary Killdahl had gotten CP/M-86 ready before Bill Gates 'bought' DOS and offered it to IBM for their PC.

That was a walk down memory lane. And do you recall what that first 10mb hard drive cost and all the fooling around with switches and other setups to get it to work. What about the cost of your first cga color monitor. All worth the price! Really puts all the new tech stuff like the Surface Pro in perspective, at least for those that remember the old days. A good debate today revolves around arguing about price, when in the 80's we were paying for far less tech with dollars that even today seem high. And we were glad to do it.
 

CrippsCorner

Well-Known Member
That is one of the games that I play the most on my iPad 4/iCade/iMame setup. Exactly like the old days... except not emptying my pocket of quarters. :)

I can see this topic changing rapidly lol, think I need to start a retro gaming thread
LOL.png
but for now... remember Pang as well? That was awesome.
 

Bazzer

Member
I like to see Bigger 20 inch plus under arm surface for drawing etc. And smaller 8 inch for reading etc. Have Pro & RT what nice about RT is no fan and no viruses.
 

MDS

Member
I worked for the Commodore dealer at the time. We had a 5mb hard drive for something like $1795!

Well to take the conversation back to the topic of rethinking Microsoft strategy, which they have stated more or less is to show others how it's done, perhaps they are somewhat depending upon us old timers willingness to pay for a state of the art product. How's that for a run on sentence, bringing it back on-topic and reminiscing at the same time.
 

guymalloc

Member
Solid state hard drive prices remind me of the early hard drive days, they seem expensive, but they're worth the extra cost. I'm wish Microsoft would slow down the progression of the Surfaces a little, so the bigger ssd's wouldn't impact the price as much. I've noticed processor's have seemed to slow in development a little, and it's a good thing. Less problems with compatability, and hardware being able to keep up. I wouldn't have a Surface Pro 1 if Microsoft hadn't pushed the Pro 2 out so fast, 'cause there was no way I was going to spend $1000 on one. But $600, that was more like it. I imagine the Pro 2's will drop once the 3's start to build in quantity, and availability. I don't think Microsoft expected the mad rush for the Surface, they weren't prepared. Apple does the opposite, it mass produces new products, and then saturates the market at release, thus keeping the competition trying to keep up.
 

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