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The crux of Windows RT devises.

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
Does the 1520 act as your phone as well? If so, where do you put that thing when walking around? Many men take the little belt holster for granted with more standard sized phones, but that thing would require a "purse" I think!

It fits in my Scottevest but most of the time it will be carried in my bag and I use Bluetooth. It really a mini-tablet that makes calls.
 

beman39

New Member
get a fanny pack/bag that's what I use, I'm confidently manly enough to pull it off and if anyone says anything I hit em over the head with my fanny pack/bag!!! LMAO
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
I could see the 2 Windows approach, the second article, I believe he is misreading his Tea Leaves. The merge will be a Unified ARM Platform. My Lumia 1520 is identical in Hardware Specs as the Lumia 2520 Tablet, one runs RT the other Phone, so in theory the 1520 could have run RT without issue, except the Desktop would be useless.
 

bluegrass

Well-Known Member
I'm going to see if I can reup this soon. I just got my 920 back in Februray. I was hoping that even being larger, that it would still fit in my front pants pocket. I take it that's not going to happen unless I wear pants with the larger patch like pockts.
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
I'm going to see if I can reup this soon. I just got my 920 back in Februray. I was hoping that even being larger, that it would still fit in my front pants pocket. I take it that's not going to happen unless I wear pants with the larger patch like pockts.

Cargo Pants would work, Suit Jacket Pockets :)
 

kristalsoldier

Well-Known Member
I could see the 2 Windows approach, the second article, I believe he is misreading his Tea Leaves. The merge will be a Unified ARM Platform. My Lumia 1520 is identical in Hardware Specs as the Lumia 2520 Tablet, one runs RT the other Phone, so in theory the 1520 could have run RT without issue, except the Desktop would be useless.

Yeah... that ZD Net guy is currently having issues with MS. Apparently he recently converted to Apple. Regardless, I also think - and I think I have mentioned this above - that MS will probably go with the 2-OS approach (aside from their other under-the-hood stuff).
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
The big question is whether the Desktop OS will be sold to the consumer or will it be an Enterprise Agreement SKU only, I could see the consumer SKU going desktop-less and includes Office Gemini and the Desktop/Full Office going to the Volume License Only route.
 

kristalsoldier

Well-Known Member
The big question is whether the Desktop OS will be sold to the consumer or will it be an Enterprise Agreement SKU only, I could see the consumer SKU going desktop-less and includes Office Gemini and the Desktop/Full Office going to the Volume License Only route.

I don't think MS would dare to restrict the Desktop OS to an Enterprise Agreement SKU till the majority of their so-called legacy apps are either ported to the Consumer SKU (variant of RT and Phone OS) or are redesigned from ground-up. And it is at this very point that I think MS's biggest strategic problem lies - how to get the timing right? Arguably, and in retrospect, MS could have waited for one additional year before releasing RT (and the Surface). Doing this would have got them to RT 8.1 and to the Surface 2 (which would have been the first edition of the Surface), which would have been a much more palatable - at least in terms of performance and capability - prospect for the consumer market. Personally, I think MS rushed to the market. I hope they don't do something like this. They have to operate along a continuum rather than in terms of disruptive shocks to the market.
 

oion

Well-Known Member
I don't think MS would dare to restrict the Desktop OS to an Enterprise Agreement SKU till the majority of their so-called legacy apps are either ported to the Consumer SKU (variant of RT and Phone OS) or are redesigned from ground-up. And it is at this very point that I think MS's biggest strategic problem lies - how to get the timing right? Arguably, and in retrospect, MS could have waited for one additional year before releasing RT (and the Surface). Doing this would have got them to RT 8.1 and to the Surface 2 (which would have been the first edition of the Surface), which would have been a much more palatable - at least in terms of performance and capability - prospect for the consumer market. Personally, I think MS rushed to the market. I hope they don't do something like this. They have to operate along a continuum rather than in terms of disruptive shocks to the market.

I'd agree with you; MS going "desktop-less" on the consumer side too soon would be a death sentence since so many Windows users rely on legacy software that aren't touch-friendly, much less Metro-ized in the back-end. The entire PC gaming industry wouldn't agree to that, certainly, but I expect people will hang onto Windows 7 for as long as Windows XP stuck around including extended support: so maybe in 13-15 years, that'd be enough time to get most things friendly to Win8 Metro. :p
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
The issue with Chicken and Egg is people are still not buying new full fledge computers at a high enough rate, but are buying Phones and Tablets (estimate this year is 1.2 Billion Smart Phones will be purchased).

x86 App developers are a lazy bunch in their very nature and need a push, PC Gaming could survive if Steam creates a Modern UI Client. It is always going to come back to that the two predominate desktop apps for 90% of consumers are Chrome and iTunes, both are Corporate Trojans.
 
OP
S

SEANT

Member
x86 App developers are a lazy bunch in their very nature . . . .

Jeff, you have made a comment or two about the legacy Windows application industry regarding the lack of innovation. With practically no reservation, I would agree with you. Most of the application have cores 10-15 years old, and the budgeted development efforts are set to bump features/capabilities only high enough to placate customers on subscription.

Early work on these applications was excellent, though, so the overall package tend to be pretty good. “Worth the money” may still be in question.

In something other than “consumption”, has there been a lot of truly innovative stuff in the mobile sector? That question may sound defensive/antagonistic, but please don’t take it that way. I really don’t know that much about software on Android or iOS. What would be your (or anybody else’s for that matter) best examples of a cutting edge mobile apps?
 

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