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Why MS killed the Start Button (most don't use/need it)

pallentx

New Member
Yeah, I really don't understand the controversy. So the start menu is now full screen - how does that really change how your work with your computer in a negative way? People who are upset by not having a graphical button to click are not the people MS should be listening to about the future of the GUI.
 

mitchellvii

Well-Known Member
So MS is somehow logging my keystrokes and knows how often i hit the Start Button? Lol, bull. MS does not have license to keylog users without their knowledge. It's called illegal wiretapping and it's a felony.

This reminds me of when MS got rid of menus in Office after 2003. They had the same argument no one uses them. Again complete BS. MS says this everytime they want to force their "vision" on us. Face it people, consumers HATE Windows 8 and primarily because of the loss of the familiar Start Button.
 

mitchellvii

Well-Known Member
MS listens to feedback? Like hell. I've been dealing with MS products for 20 years. They don't give a damn about feedback. They may give it lipservice but they are going to do what they want to do.
 

leeshor

Well-Known Member
When Win7 was in development they listened and responded on the MS blogs. Those same bloggers felt MS ignored their pleas when Win8 was in development. Fortunately MS can read, even if it's tea leaves. They don';t need to monitor your key strokes to see the writing on the wall.

Depending on what publication you read, PC sales are down 14%-18% since the release of Windows 8. Those same publications attribute that to more use of phones and/or tablets. I don't buy that, myself. None of my computer customers have managed to figure out how to replace their computer with a phone OR a tablet.
 
OP
J515OP

J515OP

Super Moderator
The thing is they don't have to replace a computer with a phone or tablet just supplement it. Once that is done then people think well I mostly check email and facebook on my phone/tablet no need to get a new computer I think I will just hang on to the one I have for another 5 years... Phones and tablets are replaced in very short cycles <= two years. Computers I am sure are much longer than that at this point and it isn't even worth an internet search to confirm that is the case :)
 

leeshor

Well-Known Member
The people I sell computers to are on a replacement cycle of every 3 to 4 years. In fact, I just replaced the computer for a customer that was built in January 2010, and at the time it was pretty good. But, their requirements for processing power and memory exceeded the abilities of that relatively new computer. As we all know every new software upgrade puts new demands on the system. I have one customer with over 125 systems and none are over 4 years old. But I have catered to customers that have more demanding uses for their systems than most.
 

tonyz3

New Member
The thread that wont die.. :excited: Not the most powerful but got the job done, Was starting to show its age and i was considering replacement, but after upgrading it to Win 8 it was a new machine, so no need to buy a new one. Wasn't that one of the points with win8 to make your older comp run a little better. in the meantime i used my extra comp fund to buy the SP. I think even if Win 8 did not come around the PC mkt would be declining for rather obvious reasons- Its the economy..not win 8... PERIOD. I also think people would rather sit on the couch and use a tablet than walk in the den and boot up a DT.
 
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Nuspieds

Active Member
The thing is they don't have to replace a computer with a phone or tablet just supplement it. Once that is done then people think well I mostly check email and facebook on my phone/tablet no need to get a new computer I think I will just hang on to the one I have for another 5 years... Phones and tablets are replaced in very short cycles <= two years. Computers I am sure are much longer than that at this point and it isn't even worth an internet search to confirm that is the case :)
Precisely.

All you have to do is look at the mobile app market; people are now performing lots of computing tasks on-the-go, on their mobile device. Thus, for many people, with so much activity now possible via their mobile device, what's the big rush to upgrade/replace their PC? This trend will continue as the mobile devices become more powerful and continue to do more.

But I don't understand what this big shock is all about and the nonsense that Windows 8 is to blame! Yes, back in the day when all your mobile phone did was make/receive calls and you were dialing into BBSes and other proprietary networks, of course new Windows versions drove the PC sales market because computing was on a PC, period. But that is no longer the case, so how can you expect Windows to drive PC sales when people are no longer as reliant on a PC as they were in the past?

The bottom line is that the computing platform is shifting and where one platform is shrinking, others are growing.
 
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J515OP

J515OP

Super Moderator
There are so many reasons why PC sales are declining it is a very serious issue. Without even trying to list them we have already hit many of them. Anybody that thought Windows 8 was some how going to save the PC industry and boost sales to the point that it was not only going to slow declining sales but actually launch them back up was sadly naive. I think this includes many analysts and professionals who should have known better but perhaps because of their past experiences or whatever other reasons couldn't change their thinking so decided it must be Windows 8's fault.

1. Economy
2. PCs are powerful enough that for many people they no longer need to upgrade to a faster machine on a regular basis
3. Newer OSes are more efficient extending the usable life of older PCs
4. Mobile devices now handle a large portion of PC tasks for the average person
5. Mobile devices are updated more frequently than PCs meaning the old PC is good enough
6. Mobile devices are increasing in power each generation the way PCs used to but are now basically stagnant in comparison
7. People are now used to "couch convenience" and don't want to have to go to the PC
8. PC design has always been an issue and they are far less "cool" than mobile devices. "Cool" PC attempts are at best rated as poor Apple copies
9. PCs are a mature market with little innovation (and what little there is focuses on making them more like mobile devices)
10. Emerging markets around the world are more likely to have access to and use mobile devices than PCs for both power and conectivity reasons

Bonus: One PC typically serves an entire household where each member of the household typically has their own mobile device.
 
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pallentx

New Member
So MS is somehow logging my keystrokes and knows how often i hit the Start Button? Lol, bull. MS does not have license to keylog users without their knowledge. It's called illegal wiretapping and it's a felony.

This reminds me of when MS got rid of menus in Office after 2003. They had the same argument no one uses them. Again complete BS. MS says this everytime they want to force their "vision" on us. Face it people, consumers HATE Windows 8 and primarily because of the loss of the familiar Start Button.

No, its called focus groups. They take (hopefully) random samples of "average" users and pay them to be guinea pigs. MS has two choices. Keep desktop user happy by not changing anything and watching their company die or dwindle to a fraction of what they are now, or try to find a way to leverage the user base they have on desktops now into the mobile world of the future. Start buttons and cascading menus don't work well on touch devices. They could just split their product line and have a mouse/keyboard OS and a touch OS, but the result of that would likely be a dwindling traditional user base and a non existent touch/mobile user base because iOS and Android have already established a strong dominance in mobile. MS knows all about how hard it is to crack this - they've seen Apple and others try for years to crack their control of the PC market. Their only hope to stay a major technology player is to find a way to use what they have as a strength to leverage them into what they don't have. Get those desktop users use to "metro" they way they are used to Windows 7 and when they drop their desktop for a tablet, maybe, just maybe, they will consider a Windows tablet because they are already familiar with that interface. Maybe its crazy, but if I ran MS, its exactly what I would do. I would bet the farm on the best strategy I could find to get into mobile. It will be success of a spectacular failure. I would rather go down in flames trying than to fizzle quietly into irrelevance.
 

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