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Okay seriously... what is up with the battery meter in Windows 8?

macmee

Active Member
I think one thing Microsoft is bad at, is perfecting all the little things in Windows 8. But the big concern I have is the battery meter:



So if you ignore that overly blurry window in the background (wifi driver is also not updating...) you will notice that the battery meter says I have 23 hours left.

This is seriously witchcraft. I know that it's doing it's best to calculate how long is left based on what I'm currently doing on my Surface but come on. 23 hours? On other Windows machines in the past, and certainly on MacBooks, their battery meters have always been more accurate.

I don't expect perfect accuracy (because that's impossible), but I expect practical accuracy. This is sheer nonsense.

Also, Microsoft should fix how half the desktop UI doesn't support high DPI displays. Blurry windows everywhere.
 

EMINENT

Active Member
I think one thing Microsoft is bad at, is perfecting all the little things in Windows 8. But the big concern I have is the battery meter:


So if you ignore that overly blurry window in the background (wifi driver is also not updating...) you will notice that the battery meter says I have 23 hours left.

This is seriously witchcraft. I know that it's doing it's best to calculate how long is left based on what I'm currently doing on my Surface but come on. 23 hours? On other Windows machines in the past, and certainly on MacBooks, their battery meters have always been more accurate.

I don't expect perfect accuracy (because that's impossible), but I expect practical accuracy. This is sheer nonsense.

Also, Microsoft should fix how half the desktop UI doesn't support high DPI displays. Blurry windows everywhere.
No problems here.

Maybe you should have bought an ipad. Less usability, less problems.


Apple working on iOS 7 update to fix the home screen crash issue
by Saleem on January 24, 2014 at 9:36 am

Sections: iPhone OS, SDK and hacks, iPhone/iPod touch/iPad

ios7devicesApple released its next-generation operating system, iOS 7, back in September last year. The launch was followed by a few updates that came with bug fixes and improvements to the overall experience. However, there are still some bugs haunting iOS 7 users, including one that causes the home screen to crash, whether you’re running an application or simply on the home screen.

After crashing, it shows you the same Apple logo as the one that appears when you turn on your device—one may call it the white screen of death for Apple devices (I’ve experienced this issue myself on my iPad running iOS 7 version).

Thankfully, Apple is aware of the bug and has mentioned that a fix is on its way in an iOS 7 update. ”We have a fix in an upcoming software update for a bug that can occasionally cause a home screen crash,” Apple spokesperson Trudy Muller told Mashable.

The issue has been reported on Apple Discussion forums several times, as well as on various social networks. When I first experienced it, I thought it may be due to an application I’m running, but later found the OS is to blame.

Reports indicate its experienced most on the iPhone, but as I said before, I came across this bug on my iPad several times in the past few weeks. Some iPhone users report they encountered a black background screen with a white logo on black iPhone, and vice versa. Others mention it also drains battery after the screen comes back. Regardless, it’s good to see Apple is working on a fix that may land with the iOS 7.1 update, which is now in its fourth beta.

Via [Mashable]
Looks like they had some sad days in the past too.
Apple iPad: Still some bugs and rough edges
By Mitch Wagner
April 05, 2010 6:00 AM EDT
You've read a lot of enthusiastic love letters to the Apple iPad in the past few days, from deliriously happy early adopters.

And I'm one of those happy buyers. So is my wife -- we bought two.

But it took some work to get the iPads configured properly, and some things still aren't working right.

So, rather than write yet another love letter to the iPad, I'll tell you some of the problems you might expect to encounter if you buy one.

First: You can't use it without syncing it to iTunes first. It's kind of a buzzkill to take your long-anticipated iPad out of its box, switch it on, get ready to play, and instead see an icon saying you need to connect to iTunes. Instead of getting right down to futuristic computing, you're going to be spending the next few minutes configuring things.

Did I say a few minutes? My first sync took more than an hour, while the iPad imported copies of all the data and settings that were on my iPhone. During that time, I chewed my nails down to my elbows.

Subsequent syncs also took a long time, more than a half-hour. At one point, I started a sync immediately after a sync ended, and even that second sync took 11 minutes--it should have taken just a few seconds, just long enough for the iPad and iMac to shake hands and realize there were no updates. Instead, the sync took forever, like two teen-age lovers who can't bear to end a phone call ("You hang up!" "No, you first!")

The slow sync problem went away by itself on my Sunday, my second day with the iPad. I'm still chasing down the cause of that bug. I think the problem might not be on the iPad; it might be on the Mac, specifically a problem with last week's Mac OS X 10.6.3 update and MobileMe. Still, I blame Apple for this -- they chose to release a major upgrade to Mac OS at the same time as the iPad, as well as an upgrade to iTunes. Of course people are going to have problems.

iPhone apps work on the iPad, although it takes some fussing for some. I had difficulty getting two of my favorite iPhone apps to work: Instapaper, an app for reading articles, and Boxcar, an app for receiving push notifications from Twitter, Facebook, and more.

My quick-fix for those two apps was to simply log out of them and long back in again. It seems that would be a good fix for any iPhone app that synchs over the cloud. However, that didn't work with PushGmail, which sends push Gmail alerts to the iPhone, I'm still trying to straighten that out.

iPhone apps on the iPad either appear in a little box, or doubled in size to fill the screen. I found the doubled apps were a little jaggy. They're still usable, but I'm looking forward to those apps getting native iPad equivalents.

The iPad doesn't always appear to charge when connected to some computers and USB hubs. The problem is that older computers, and USB hubs, often don't send enough power through the USB ports to charge the iPad, Macworld's Dan Frakes explains. The solution: Plug the iPad directly into the wall socket, or connect it to a newer computer's USB port. Or just leave it alone; the iPad will charge when it's asleep, even though when awake the display says, confusingly, "Not Charging." I got the "Not Charging" message when connecting the iPad to my USB hub, but not when connecting directly to my 2009 iMac.

I found several quirks in the Pages app for the iPad. The first quirk: It doesn't sync documents to the desktop; rather, it makes a local copy. This can create versioning problems if you work on a document on the iPad and then on the desktop, or vice-versa.

Soon after discovering that problem, I discovered the reason for it: The iPad app strips significant metadata from desktop word processing documents, including section breaks, bookmarks, comments, and repeating headers except for the first instance.

You may have heard about Gmail's slick new interface for the iPad. The new Gmail iPad interface hasn't arrived yet for Google Apps mail. I found both Google Apps mail and Google Reader to be a little bumpy on the iPad; still very usable, but not as nice as they could be, and probably will be in a few short months. Quick tip: If you want to scroll the app, rather than the browser window, scroll with two fingers.

And, of course, as is already well known, Flash doesn't work on the iPad's Mobile Safari. I flipped through my "to watch" folder in my Safari bookmarks, and found most of the videos didn't play. On the other hand, YouTube videos do play, even videos embedded into other Web pages.

The final problem with the iPad: It makes my iPhone look ridiculous. The iPhone looks like an iPad for dolls.

But I'm getting silly now. Like I said: My wife and I are very happy with our iPads, we're glad we bought them when we did. But I don't want to write yet another blog or article praising the iPad. You can already find a million of those. I just want to let you know about some problems you might encounter if you decide to buy one for yourself.
 
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CrippsCorner

Well-Known Member
Wow, never had that problem. If anything, mine tends to go the other way... at least your Surface is being optimistic huh!? Look on the bright side dude :)
 

dl1234

New Member
Mine does exactly the same. It varies enormously, sometimes showing 1h 50m and then the next minute 11h. It's also jumped up to 21h like yours. It seems based on a very short sampling interval and brain dead extrapolation.
 
OP
macmee

macmee

Active Member
Wow, never had that problem. If anything, mine tends to go the other way... at least your Surface is being optimistic huh!? Look on the bright side dude :)
Yeah, dare to dream :D

No problems here.

Maybe you should have bought an ipad. Less usability, less problems.

Looks like they had some sad days in the past too.
I also own an iPad and I've virtually had no issues with it. iPads do the least but work the best, Windows tablets do the most and work the worst, and Android is somewhere inbetween.
 
OP
macmee

macmee

Active Member
First: Microsoft has over a decade of OS development experience, and from this experience as well as being aware of principles such as the law of conservation of complexity, Microsoft should have appropriate planned ahead, and organized development on this product in a manner which is proportionate to its complexity. Knowing how to allocate the right amount of resources for a task in any sort of business is important, and the fact that Microsoft with all their experience and money failed to accommodate accordingly for this product speaks volumes for both Microsoft's ability to deliver reliable products, as well as for their blatant indifference towards customer satisfaction.

Two examples: the firmware disaster of December. I can forgive Microsoft for inadequately testing the firmware. I cannot forgive Microsoft for delaying a resolution to the problem for over a month. If they could not release a patch, or a rollback, then at the very least they could have offered consumers compensation or even a free exchange on their device. Microsoft did none of these things. Second, there are major bugs that immense amounts of users experience such as the sleep crash bug which even existed on the Surface Pro 1 and now on the 2, and even though this major bug which effects many users has existed since the creation of the original Surface, it has yet to be addressed and fixed. Completely outrageous.

Second: When using Windows I expect to completely reinstall the operating system several times a year. I consistently encounter problems using Windows. It is extremely rare that I have experienced a problem using OS X, and I have never once had to reinstall OS X on a machine due to malfunction. You can defend Microsoft until you're blue in the face but you'll never change the fact that I have had countless problems with Microsoft's products over the years, whereas I have had very few problems with Apple's. I may have purchased and continue to enjoy my Surface Pro 2, but you would never catch me running Windows as my primary OS these days. Too much headache.
 

CreativeLemming

Active Member
First: Microsoft has over a decade of OS development experience, and from this experience as well as being aware of principles such as the law of conservation of complexity, Microsoft should have appropriate planned ahead, and organized development on this product in a manner which is proportionate to its complexity. Knowing how to allocate the right amount of resources for a task in any sort of business is important, and the fact that Microsoft with all their experience and money failed to accommodate accordingly for this product speaks volumes for both Microsoft's ability to deliver reliable products, as well as for their blatant indifference towards customer satisfaction.

Two examples: the firmware disaster of December. I can forgive Microsoft for inadequately testing the firmware. I cannot forgive Microsoft for delaying a resolution to the problem for over a month. If they could not release a patch, or a rollback, then at the very least they could have offered consumers compensation or even a free exchange on their device. Microsoft did none of these things. Second, there are major bugs that immense amounts of users experience such as the sleep crash bug which even existed on the Surface Pro 1 and now on the 2, and even though this major bug which effects many users has existed since the creation of the original Surface, it has yet to be addressed and fixed. Completely outrageous.

Second: When using Windows I expect to completely reinstall the operating system several times a year. I consistently encounter problems using Windows. It is extremely rare that I have experienced a problem using OS X, and I have never once had to reinstall OS X on a machine due to malfunction. You can defend Microsoft until you're blue in the face but you'll never change the fact that I have had countless problems with Microsoft's products over the years, whereas I have had very few problems with Apple's. I may have purchased and continue to enjoy my Surface Pro 2, but you would never catch me running Windows as my primary OS these days. Too much headache.
I'm sure they do, just thought this would be an interesting article for people to read when somebody posts an iPad vd Android vs Windows statement. Microsoft as we all know have a long legacy of desktop and enterprise behind them and are trying hard to close the gap between themselves and their rivals. Wasn't trying to making any point or argument by posting, other than to provide some interesting information that I thought people might find a good read.

Btw, I have twice had to return my Mac (pro and air) to the apple store for drive replacement after (a) an unrecoverable boot error and (b) random shutdowns and lock ups. Nomidea if a firmware update caused this, probably just bad luck but Ive had bad experience with both.
 
OP
macmee

macmee

Active Member
I'm sure they do, just thought this would be an interesting article for people to read when somebody posts an iPad vd Android vs Windows statement. Microsoft as we all know have a long legacy of desktop and enterprise behind them and are trying hard to close the gap between themselves and their rivals. Wasn't trying to making any point or argument by posting, other than to provide some interesting information that I thought people might find a good read.

Btw, I have twice had to return my Mac (pro and air) to the apple store for drive replacement after (a) an unrecoverable boot error and (b) random shutdowns and lock ups. Nomidea if a firmware update caused this, probably just bad luck but Ive had bad experience with both.
I own the Surface Pro 2, iPad, Nexus 7 and HP Touchpad. I do enjoy different things about each tablet but at the end of the day I would choose my Surface over my other tablets. However, the Surface has the most bugs out of all these other tablets combined.

Bad experiences exist with Apple but in all my long experiences using products from both companies Microsoft has had many more issues.
 

CrippsCorner

Well-Known Member
Let's be honest, everything is crap :) sometimes. Between my girlfriend and I we have experienced...

Dell PC - USB slots stopped working

Dell laptop - HDD died

iMac (old) - Ended up unable to boot

iMac (new) - Stutters through any video playback and throws up multiple errors upon booting

Surface Pro - Bluetooth/Wi-Fi conflict (doesn't happen on any other PC set up)

iPhone 4S - Audio wouldn't record in videos and loudspeaker died

iPhone 5S - Battery died

Nokia 920 - Constant connection problems

Just be happy with what you've got I say! Or as a colleague of mine likes to put it, "Technology... use it, but don't rely on it".
 
OP
macmee

macmee

Active Member
Let's be honest, everything is crap :) sometimes. Between my girlfriend and I we have experienced...

Dell PC - USB slots stopped working

Dell laptop - HDD died

iMac (old) - Ended up unable to boot

iMac (new) - Stutters through any video playback and throws up multiple errors upon booting

Surface Pro - Bluetooth/Wi-Fi conflict (doesn't happen on any other PC set up)

iPhone 4S - Audio wouldn't record in videos and loudspeaker died

iPhone 5S - Battery died

Nokia 920 - Constant connection problems

Just be happy with what you've got I say! Or as a colleague of mine likes to put it, "Technology... use it, but don't rely on it".
You have bad luck, again I like my Surface but it's definitely the most buggy machine I've owned. I BSOD'd today (irq_not_equal) when I was just using oneNote.
 

CrippsCorner

Well-Known Member
Still 50/50 here lol... this week I've had my Surface randomly reboot as soon as I attached the Type Cover
and I had my iPhone turn off saying dead battery, plugged it into charger and it instantly booted up and said I do have battery, wtf.
 
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