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RDP to Desktop -- Discoveries & Challenges

Russ

Active Member
I have read with interest how Jeff & others use the Surface as an access point to desktops for real work. So, I just had to try it. Mostly it was a successful venture. It has been raining all day, so it was a good day to play with computers.

Here are the players:
RWSurface -- My Surface RT
Win8-1 -- My "main" computer, running Win8 Pro, 64-Bit, which sometimes masquerades as,
Win7-1 -- When booted into Win7 Ultimate, 64-Bit
Win8-2 -- My shop computer which runs Win8 Pro, 64-Bit, as its primary OS.
Win7-4 -- My office computer, running Win7 Ultimate, 32-Bit
Win7-2 -- Running Win7 Ultimate, 64-Bit. (This is one I keep for my Ladyfriend to use, and, since it's set up in Chinese language, it feels kinda silly when I get there and don't know what to do.)
HPEnvy -- HP Laptop running Win7 Pro, 64-Bit

I have others, but these were the ones running when I decided to do this.

From the Surface, I can connect RDP to Win8-1, Win8-2, Win7-4, Win7-2 & HPEnvy.

I even found that I can RDP to Win8-1, and then have it RDP to Win8-2. Not sure why I would ever want to do that, but at least now I know I can if the occasion arises.

I have not yet been able to RDP to Win7-1 (when booted as such). Don't know why as yet. It isn't a 32/64-bit issue, since I can connect to both Win7-2 & Win7-4. I have retraced all my steps and still can't connect, so, for the moment, it remains a mystery. (My Ladyfriend suggested that it is something that I did in a past life, but I don't find that very helpful.)

If the rain continues tomorrow, I will boot up a couple more systems just to see if I can eliminate more of the variables. My real goal is to set up her Surface Pro so that she can RDP to her computer at the office or at home. That would really be useful for her.

All of the above is (a) what happens when rain cancels my outside plans, and (b) "For Whatever It's Worth," which, in the grand scheme of things, is probably not much.

Regards,
Russ
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
I actually use RDP leap flogging when I manage my Private Cloud Infrastructure as I only have one machine accessible from the outside.
 

ARosch

Member
That is really cool, good to see that you got it working on different devices and operating systems. The idea of RDP Leapfrogging seems crazy but I can also see uses for it. You should see if you can leapfrog through all of them.
 
OP
Russ

Russ

Active Member
@jnjroach

Thanks, Jeff. My interest is in providing access primarily for data transfer. There is little likelihood that program execution would be needed.

@ARosch

re: "The idea of RDP Leapfrogging seems crazy but I can also see uses for it. You should see if you can leapfrog through all of them."

Yeah, I can postulate uses for the "leapfrogging," but just don't have any current applications for the process. If it rains again tomorrow, I may try to see how long I can extend the chain.

Regards,
Russ
 
OP
Russ

Russ

Active Member
Check the policies.
Ok, Arnold. The problem with you really smart guys is that you assume that I have a clue as to how to do that. I did a search in the Microsoft Store for "get a clue," but it came back and said, "You're screwed."

This system is really intuitive and insightful.

One more little insight would be helpful.

Take care,

Russ
 

ArnoldC

New Member
I'm sorry to be terse...

On the Windows 7 machine, run MMC, then File -> Add/remove Snap-in. In the Available Snap-in list, select Group Policy Object, and it will prompt you for Local, if not connected to a Domain. When you click Ok, the MMC (Microsoft Management Console) will now have Local Computer Policy with two folders- Computer Cofiguration and User Configuration. This is where you can check for allowed or disallowed features/functions. On a corporate network this is the method to lock-down company computers.
 

jnjroach

Administrator
Staff member
Does the Windows 7 instance have the same IP address as the Windows 8 instance? They both have the same MAC Address, so it may confuse the Window 8 connection string. I would hard code the IP address on the Windows 7 instance and connect via IP instead of host name for the RDP session.
 

R0bR

Member
Does the Windows 7 instance have the same IP address as the Windows 8 instance? They both have the same MAC Address, so it may confuse the Window 8 connection string. I would hard code the IP address on the Windows 7 instance and connect via IP instead of host name for the RDP session.
Or flush the DNS cache prior to connecting by launching the command prompt as administrator and issuing the 'ipconfig /flushdns' (without quotes of course).
 

ArnoldC

New Member
I did an RDP from Surface RT to Windows 7 yesterday at the office.

My Acer Aspire S3 has native boot to Windows 7, upgraded to Enterprise. The Windows 8 is boot froom VHD, configured with bcdedit (because I had to remove Windows 8 Developer Preview and Windows 8 Consumer Preview, both of which are also boot from VHD configured). This computer has the same fixed IP address on both Windows 7 and Windows 8 boot, as it has an "all-pass" configuration on our firewall.

My post about Local Policies may no longer apply, as you're ok with Win7-4 and Win7-2. So perhaps, you can also check the Windows 7 edition on Win7-1. But if you were able to configure its remote settings, then it is the right edition.
 
OP
Russ

Russ

Active Member
Arnold & Everybody else who has offered help --

Thank you!

If you hear an angelic chuckling sound coming down thru the clouds, it's my Wife sitting up there laughing at me. She always said that I carried tenacity to the point of being a fault. I'm really not good at just letting a problem go unsolved, even though its solution will not noticeably improve my life.

So, this is what I've done and where I am:

1 - The problem exists on Win7-1, not the Surface. I cannot access Win7-1 via RDP from either Win7-2 or Win7-4. I can connect RDP to those machines from Win7-1. All three machines are Win7 Ultimate (7-1 & 7-2 are 64Bit, 7-4 is 32Bit), and are on the wired network.
2 - Assuredly, remote access is configured on Win7-1 and the Firewall permits access. I disabled the AntiVirus, but it made no difference. Besides, all three of the Win7- machines run the same antivirus program.
3 - I set a static IP on Win7-1 and rebooted the router just to flush out the old stuff. Numerous system reboots have occurred.
4 - Arnold: I followed your instructions re: Policy, and got far enough to find a list of users for whom No Group Policy Object Exists.
5 - I ran sfc /scannow a couple of times, just because it seemed like a good idea.
6 - Win7-1 is on ASUS P9X79 Deluxe, Intel I7 3820, with 16GB Memory. It has two network connections, and I have tried both. (Win7-2&4 are also on Asus motherboards, with slightly lesser CPUs.)

7 - From Surface, Win7-2, & Win7-4: I can ping Win7-1 and browse its folders at will. I can transfer files in either direction.

So, I can do a lot of stuff.

What I cannot do is acess Win7-1 via Remote Desktop -- either by computer name or IP address.

I have, for the moment only, run out of ideas to try.

What I am going to do right now is take my dogs and go down by the creek to see what yesterday's rain added. At least that is something I know how to do.

Thanks again and take care,

Russ
 
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