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Unexpected Benefits

I was wondering if, once you got your Surface, you disc hovered a benefit that you hadn't even anticipated when you got it. For instance.....

I just got my Surface 3, and I thought I knew all the reasons I wanted it. But I've been using it as my main device in my office and a usage began slowly dawning on me. I noticed that my usual pattern prior to owning the Surface was that when I just needed to read something on the computer, I would hunch over for long stretches and just read. Then it dawned on me, with the Surface, why do that? I can just remove the screen, bring it closer to my face and review the item while sitting back comfortably in my chair. That's something I could never do with my previous office PC.
 

hughlle

Super Moderator
Staff member
Being able to use it as a tablet was rather one of the key selling points on the device.
 

malberttoo

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if, once you got your Surface, you disc hovered a benefit that you hadn't even anticipated when you got it. For instance.....

I just got my Surface 3, and I thought I knew all the reasons I wanted it. But I've been using it as my main device in my office and a usage began slowly dawning on me. I noticed that my usual pattern prior to owning the Surface was that when I just needed to read something on the computer, I would hunch over for long stretches and just read. Then it dawned on me, with the Surface, why do that? I can just remove the screen, bring it closer to my face and review the item while sitting back comfortably in my chair. That's something I could never do with my previous office PC.

Reaching out and un-pinching to zoom in on something, is something I have gotten very attached to... : )
 

kristalsoldier

Well-Known Member
Reaching out and un-pinching to zoom in on something, is something I have gotten very attached to... : )

Exactly!!!!!

Edit: The other thing I discovered is the sheer joy of being mobile. My SP3 with S3 (accompanied by the MS Arc Mouse SE and the Stylus) linked through OneDrive and coupled with my Win Phone gives me the flexibility to literally work from anywhere (assuming a good net connection, of course).
 
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ScottyS

Active Member
The biggest "unexpected benefit" was when I first got a Surface, while I was carrying it around at work I'd want to show someone a file (a picture or a pdf, etc.) and my first reaction was "Oh, I have that file on my PC at home". Then I'd realize I'm holding my PC from home in my hands.

I have two 2TB portable HDs at home for all my files and backup, and can take one with me if I travel. But with OneDrive there's no reason not to be able to have all my stuff with me.

Also, using OneNote in portrait in tablet mode, taking notes with the pen in lectures and meetings also turned out to be one of the best features.
 

Arizona Willie

Active Member
How do you couple it to your Windows Phone?

I'm trying to decide between Android and Windows for my first Smart Phone.
I lean to Windows for " compatability " but really how many compatability issues are there anymore? Android Phones take pictures in standard formats, Office is available in many platforms ( not sure about Android ) but I bet Open Office is in Android and those files could be sent to a Windows computer with no problem.

It seems the main advantage of an Android phone would be the number of apps available and ( often ) the quality of the apps.

Would those of you who have experience with both types of phones agree with that?

Or am I wrong?
===========

Exactly!!!!!

Edit: The other thing I discovered is the sheer joy of being mobile. My SP3 with S3 (accompanied by the MS Arc Mouse SE and the Stylus) linked through OneDrive and coupled with my Win Phone gives me the flexibility to literally work from anywhere (assuming a good net connection, of course).
 

Telstar1948

Active Member
How do you couple it to your Windows Phone?

I'm trying to decide between Android and Windows for my first Smart Phone.
I lean to Windows for " compatability " but really how many compatability issues are there anymore? Android Phones take pictures in standard formats, Office is available in many platforms ( not sure about Android ) but I bet Open Office is in Android and those files could be sent to a Windows computer with no problem.

It seems the main advantage of an Android phone would be the number of apps available and ( often ) the quality of the apps.

Would those of you who have experience with both types of phones agree with that?

Or am I wrong?
===========


I had a Nokia 920. Fine phone, but I wanted a larger screen and the ability to use a pen to take notes. That led me to the GN3. I love this phone. Never had Android anything before, but this phone is great. It literally has everything I want. You can now get Office on it or one of the other compatible Office apps - they work well. Of course, OneNote is available as well. I had some compatibility problems with everything syncing with Outlook (not everyone it seems has had these issues, but many have had). I went with eM Client as my Outlook replacement on my SP3. By doing that, my calendar and contacts sync with my Google account with no issues at all. Going back to Outlook, I had my MS Account and Google Account linked, and that is supposed to allow a certain syncing, but for whatever reason I had issues with calendar and contact linking properly. So, I don't use Outlook for that reason. If some guru could erase the sync issues I've experienced using Outlook, I'd go back to Outlook - not because I'm dissatisfied with Outlook but more to use it since I pay for it. Anyway, that's my experience.
 

kristalsoldier

Well-Known Member
How do you couple it to your Windows Phone?

I'm trying to decide between Android and Windows for my first Smart Phone.
I lean to Windows for " compatability " but really how many compatability issues are there anymore? Android Phones take pictures in standard formats, Office is available in many platforms ( not sure about Android ) but I bet Open Office is in Android and those files could be sent to a Windows computer with no problem.

It seems the main advantage of an Android phone would be the number of apps available and ( often ) the quality of the apps.

Would those of you who have experience with both types of phones agree with that?

Or am I wrong?
===========

I could have written a wall of text to describe how the set up works for me. But here is a quick sketch (made on my Surface 3).
work flow.jpg
 
having a full pc that doesn't weigh over 5 lbs, the surface pro line of tablets have taken me away from the "desk environment". I find myself doing more things outside on the patio/laying in bed or on the go. The sp3 goes everywhere I go as I hate dealing with files-web surfing on my phone, I still have a workhorse desktop rig as I need the extra horse power for gaming- photo editing-htpc.
 

Arizona Willie

Active Member
Thanks for going to all that trouble making that drawing.

What I was asking was how do you electronically couple your SP to your Phone?

mmmm perhaps I'm not phrasing that right.

How does the phone couple to the Surface?
What program / technique?

Woooppsss ... I think I see. You are using One Drive to " couple " them. They aren't being " coupled " electronically ... you just use One Drive for file storage which make them available to all computers on your network.
===========

I could have written a wall of text to describe how the set up works for me. But here is a quick sketch (made on my Surface 3).
View attachment 6400
 

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