Article suggests Intel and MS are killing off the RT device

Discussion in 'Microsoft Surface General Discussion' started by machistmo, May 5, 2013.

  1. machistmo

    machistmo Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Raleigh NC
    My Device:
    Other
  2. brocharlieb

    brocharlieb Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Near Huntsville, Alabama
    I am enjoying my Surface RT, but I don't see much indication that it's being supported in a way that gives it a future. I could be wrong, and even hope I am. If all it ever is is what it is, I paid too much but got something out of it. If it becomes what it could be...well, only time will tell.
     
  3. kristalsoldier

    kristalsoldier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2,314
    Likes Received:
    357
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My Device:
    SPro4
    I am not sure I agree with the author's point of view. Essentially, the author's contention, in my reading, is based on two assertions: (1) that the RT cannot run legacy apps/ programs; (2) Intel is said to be bringing out more powerful low-cost and low-power consumption chips. While the second assertion may be true, and the first is undeniable, the author does not give any consideration to the stated MS strategy (which is now, more than ever, focused on convergence and where the question of the "desktop-mode" is being critically re-assessed) and how this may be furthered in what Blue is supposed (more accurately, speculated on) to bring to the party.
     
  4. machistmo

    machistmo Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Raleigh NC
    My Device:
    Other
    Well with the Acer and other 379$ pro devices coming out, I don't see where the RT fits.
     
  5. jnjroach

    jnjroach Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,095
    Likes Received:
    1,724
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    RT will continue to be for a stable and secure eco system. The x86 side as long as it supports legacy applications and drivers and you can bypass UEFI through disabling Secure Boot it will be Subject to additional instabilities and vulnerability. My colleague has an Atom based Tablet that he uses in a similar use case as I use my Surface RT, but due to drivers and the fact he loads legacy software his stability is pretty weak. My RT out performs his Atom.
     
  6. Nuspieds

    Nuspieds Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    I think it is too soon to state that the Surface RT is on its death bed.

    It is a new product with a new OS and MS Office alone will not keep it alive. If developers and partners do not get behind and support it, then I believe it will be retired. Until we get clear evidence that no one except practically MS is developing for and supporting it, I believe it will still be around.
     
  7. machistmo

    machistmo Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2012
    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Raleigh NC
    My Device:
    Other
    Our organization looked into the RT, but it failed to get any traction. Ultimately we decided on the TPT2's as they have the possibility to replace the laptop completely. The RT was a great thought from a secure standpoint, from a management and support standpoint it was also fantastic. From a reality standpoint it didn't make the cut. NOONE liked them as a useable device, not to mention the Office that comes with it is a Home and Student version and would have required painful license upgrades. Our Apps Architect loves his RT while I jumped at the chance to trade mine in for the Pro. I just don't see the place it holds in the market other than it has the Home and Student Office included, which should not by any means be discounted. That's not that smart from a sales standpoint though, as every RT sale means one more copy of Office they wont sell.

    The RT would be excellent in the $299 and $349 price points. At $500 its just not worth the money, even with the H&S Office. The mail client is better with the recent patches, but still feels boring and blah-esque. the Tegra3 is ok but its what, 3 years old now? 2.8 years?
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2013
  8. jnjroach

    jnjroach Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,095
    Likes Received:
    1,724
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    If your company has an EA it covers using Office RT for business or if you have a E1 Office365 Subscription. Also it is the best VDI client...
     
  9. kristalsoldier

    kristalsoldier Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2013
    Messages:
    2,314
    Likes Received:
    357
    Trophy Points:
    83
    My Device:
    SPro4
    Again, I am not sure I would agree with this assessment. In my opinion (which is all that this is), there are a couple of points that need to be pondered.

    First, the RT is the perfect vehicle for the Office 365 service (which, incidentally, ties in directly to the stated MS strategy of being a services and devices company going forward). This obviates the need for MS Office Home and Student. I suspect Office H&S was included in the first generation of RT machines because MS has not yet fully prepared the idea of Office 365 either to the market or, I suspect, to themselves (especially in terms of back-end services). I think they will have this sorted out within the next 24 months. I also think MS - being a truly global company with products that are used in countries which may not be able to provide 24/7 online capabilities - having a locally based software (Office H&S in this case) is necessary.

    Second, if you stop to think about it, the RT is a machine that responds to what I would refer to the "law of averages".

    By this I mean simply this: MS must have figured out that most people use only a small percentage of the full capabilities of their computers. RT is targeting that segment of the market. I think MS has made an informed decision that if they take care of the basic use-scenarios (which includes Office), the remaining gaps would be covered by Apps from the Store. Now, admittedly, that has not yet worked out from our perspective given our expectations based on our familiarity with the Stores of Apple and Android. But, that situation, I think is and will improve in favour of MS (yes, I also wish it would be faster).

    As a minor - but no less important point - which I mentioned earlier, we need to factor in what Blue brings to the table. Your justified complaints about apps like the Mail app would most likely be fixed. Who knows, some additional capabilities may also be added. As you may have noticed, since its release the RT has benefited from some system-level updates which has made it much better (which I take to mean that there has been some kind of software-based optimization at the chip level). I expect to see some more of such improvements.

    Of course, it is true that the Tegra stands to be replaced in the next edition of the RT, but then that was to be expected. I think it is too early to call the RT a failure and to predict its imminent withdrawal from the market by MS.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Grape Jelly

    Grape Jelly Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I suppose nothing would surprise me. However, this doesn't read as an authoritative piece, but yet another piece predicting the untimely death of RT. However, this is a glimmer of a point here being that Haswell and other advances may bring a full Pro experience with RT battery life. If you can deliver both Pro power and RT experience in one package, then why have two separate packages.

    Right now I own both an RT and a Pro. I reach for the Pro FAR more than the RT. However, they are clearly two distinct experiences. The primary reason I gravitate to the Pro is that I use Visual Studio and Gimp.
     
  11. scharp

    scharp New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2013
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Which is great for an enterprise solution but where does that leave the consumer? Why would the average buyer choose the RT over Android and IOS (2 mature platforms with substantial developer support) or a full blown windows machine with backwards compatibilty at around the same price? The RT may be great for Office 365, but is Office going to save the RT. IOS and Android already have apps that can read and edit those files. Maybe not to the same extent but if people want that they'll just get an Atom tablet or the Pro. Do you think Microsoft only want the business crowd that are willing to overlook the above?

    Microsoft doesn't have to kill off RT, theres already barely any place for it. I'm sure Microsoft has enough resources to push RT at a loss and that in the distant future it has a sustainable place. Maybe Blue will take all of Microsoft's platform to a place where they can coexist and live happily ever after. But I don't think any consumer should purchase a device based on what it may potentially become rather that what it actually is.

    The RT might be a great solution for the business crowd. But is that enough?
     
  12. jnjroach

    jnjroach Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,095
    Likes Received:
    1,724
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Seattle, WA USA
    My Device:
    Surface Book
    Why would a consumer purchase an RT device? Easy, you've invested in the Microsoft Eco System and/or you want native Office Support that actually works. My 12 year old is a prime example, he with his own money purchased a Lumia 920 and I got him a Surface RT to use at school and for homework. He uses these devices while mobile and syncs to his desktop.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
death of rt intel haswell
,
microsoft killing surface rt
,

s0ix power state

,
surface rt kill off